The Fault in Our Stars by John Green: Mawkish at best, Exploitative at worst

fault-in-our-star The Fault in Our Stars is a book about a young 16 year old girl Hazel GraceLancaster who has been diagnosed with thyroid cancer and attends a cancer support group.In the support group, Hazel meets a young boy named Augustus Waters. He is charming, enthusiastic and witty. Augustus has had osteosarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer, but has recently had the all clear.
And while Hazel makes it her policy not to get too close to people for fear of hurting them when she dies, she can’t help but to start falling for Augustus. Hazel and Augustus embark on a roller coaster ride of emotions, love, sadness and romance, while searching for Peter Van Houten the author of An Imperial Affliction, their favorite book. They travel to Amsterdam to meet the author. While on their trip Augustus breaks some heartbreaking news to Hazel and both of their worlds fall apart around them.
It is a love interest that is just too perfect, quirky and smart characters with a secondary cast that is barely developed further than their function
I had never read a John Green novel prior to reading this one. I read this book out of curiosity generated through overwhelmingly positive reviews and listing on Kindle Bestseller. I wanted very much to like it and was hoping for an awesome and heartbreaking experience. I was excited and set my expectation bar high but unfortunately I found this book below my anticipation level.
I had a lot of problems with this book.. Overall, it felt very insincere and I was constantly distracted by how obviously everything was written with the goal of tugging on the reader’s heart strings, rather than just letting things happen that were beautiful in spite of being sad. It felt like Mr. Green was screaming at me from the page

‘ARE YOU SAD YET? YOU’RE SAD RIGHT? THIS IS SAD. YOU SHOULD FEEL ALL THE THINGS AND CRY ABOUT IT. I’M A GOOD WRITER. I WRITE FEELINGS. ARE YOU CRYING YET?’

For a story about Human Beings, it doesn’t feel very human at all. Instead everything feels very unnatural and self-conscious in the worst way.
Despite my lack of enthusiasm, I expected to give it three stars because I didn’t consider it to be a bad book and it was well-written enough; however, as the book wore on, I began to realize that I was growing more and more bored and found myself struggling to read on. This was something I hadn’t anticipated. I’d prepared myself for many different possibilities: heartbreak, a changed perspective on life and death, disdain, annoyance… but not bored indifference. Hence the lower rating.

1 thought on “The Fault in Our Stars by John Green: Mawkish at best, Exploitative at worst”

  1. Priyanka I think you were looking for something interesting reading to get into festive mood for Christmas but i
    t appears that you were caught in a dilemma of selecting a book based on reviews which was not approved by you.Sometime I wonder how one selects books for reading.Can you through some light.

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